THE WIMPACT

A Feminist Music Collective

Filtering by Category: Member of the Month

Member of the Month: Jessica Brown

Our May Wimpact Member of the Month comes to us from the world of music festival operations. Meet Jessica Brown, an incredibly upbeat and hard-working festival gal who has been a jack-of-all-trades across the industry for almost a decade! Read our interview with Jess below and learn a little bit more about her and festival ops.

 

Photo courtesy of Jessica Brown

Q: Tell us a little bit about yourself.

I grew up loving the live music experience.  I’d drive 4 hours to see a show and then drive back that night barely making it in time for homeroom morning bell in high school. Going to shows lit me up, and I loved the feeling that everyone in the room was unified, we were all experiencing the same sort of happiness, together. I feel very fortunate to be working in the industry today! 

Industries I’ve worked In: Producing music festivals, high-end weddings, hospitality, yoga/wellness festivals

Hobbies: Love to snowboard & hike, hanging out with my little brothers, looking at pictures of dogs on the internet

Fun Facts: I grew up on a farm in Kansas. I have a secret love for dinosaurs. Recently traveled to India, Nepal, Indonesia & West Africa - I love connecting with people all over the world and learning about different cultures.

 

Q: Tell us a little bit about your work in the festival operations world.

Photo courtesy of Jessica Brown

I have worked in the festival industry for over 9 years.  I actually started out on a super high note, as festival director of an incredible little festival called Roots N Blues N BBQ.  I had an amazing boss lady mentor and in those first few years in the industry I grew more professionally than I ever expected. We were building this brand new festival, and there was a lot of room for experimenting with ideas, and working to figure out the best way to make parts of it work. I learned to own my shit, call the shots, and morphed into my own version of a boss lady. From there, I dove deeper into the inner workings of other music festivals and have made my living free lancing. I wanted to learn how everything operated on the front line - from production to merchandise to VIP and operations.  As of recently, I’ve shifted gears and have helped produce yoga festivals all over the country!

 

Q: Which festivals / events have you worked at? 

KAABOO, Roots N Blues N BBQ Festival, Country Jam, Mountain Jam, Taste of Country, Country on the River, Summerset, Telluride Blues & Brews, Crash My Playa, Dave Matthews & Tim Reynolds in Mexico, Wanderlust festivals & various others. 

 

Photo courtesy of Jessica Brown

Q: What different roles have you worked in? Any challenges or triumphs that come with any of them specifically?

I like to think I’m a swiss army knife of festival operations ;) I’ve been everything from intern to festival director.  And everything in between: Artist relations & hospitality coordinator, box office manager, VIP manager, staffing coordinator, guest experience manager, credentials manager, operations admin, & project coordinator. 

One of my favorite lines is "I'll need to speak with your boss".  Well sir/ma'm, I AM THE BOSS.  Some people don't think you belong where you are, whether your a woman or your too young. You got there for a reason, and you deserve to be EXACTLY where you are, keep workin' it. 

 

Q: In your experience working festivals, what has your working relationship with other women in the industry been like?

I’ve been surprised by the number of badass ladies that I’ve had the pleasure of working with throughout the years. Our bonds on site get us through long days, and some of my very favorite people in the world are women I have worked with on site during festivals and events.  There’s nothing like seven 16-hour days in a row to bring people together, am I right? There is always enough work to go around, so encouraging each other to continue to get involved and push further is key.

 

Photo courtesy of Jessica Brown

Q: Do you find the festival operations world to be inclusive and supportive of women?  

I think women are consistently proving that we belong in the industry and that we are an essential piece to the festival operations pie.  Production and operations teams still seem to be loaded heavily with men, but I’ve seen several women diving head first into those departments as well. Keep it up ladies!

 

Q: What would be your advice to other festival gals in regards to fighting for equality and championing other women? 

We’re all in this together. By another woman succeeding and moving up the ladder, you succeed too. We are all paving the way for each other in this industry. It's important for us women to foster work environments that are supportive for each other. 

Also, when being a boss lady….you can be kind and still get shit done. In fact, you can probably get a lot more done.  I think women can feel that they need to be tough, or loud, or overly assertive to get their voice heard. Don’t feel like you need to morph into an a-hole to be taken seriously. Share well thought out plans, carefully choose your words, and always work to keep things moving in the right direction.  Handle your business, and stay on top of your shit, and you’ll be taken seriously. 

 

Photo courtesy of Jessica Brown

Q: What's next for you? Anything that members of The Wimpact can help support?  

I’d love to figure out how to help women in the industry find balance. For years I’ve found myself saying, I’ll start reading that book, or start that challenge, or build that website as soon as I have a little time to spend at home.  The reality of this industry is that you are on the road A LOT, and it is important to be able to still work towards your goals every day.  I’d love to help develop systems for women so they can consistently have beautiful, full, accomplished days….instead of feeling ragged and in survival mode after 3 weeks on the road. I’ll keep you posted on what’s to come! ;)

Member of the Month: Claudia Saenz

Claudia Saenz

Let’s give it up for another great woman in music.  The Wimpact applauds 28-year-old “Tejana” Claudia Saenz, a DJ and the founder of Chulita Vinyl Club, which was recently featured on NPR.  She was a big part of the first annual Women In Music! Bay Area festival as a panelist at the Pandora headquarters in Oakland this past weekend.  

Her nostalgic and proud description of growing up in Rio Grande Valley, Texas was one of family and close ones living in low-income neighborhoods, but being rich in spirit and rich in culture. As she told NPR, listening to chicano soul was “a way of archiving history.”  Before her career as a DJ started, she earned a degree in History from the University of Texas Pan American.  

Photo via CVC's Facebook

Saenz has taken a male-dominated genre and unintentionally created a movement with fellow chulitas that embrace the historic sounds of corridos and rancheras.  It is a generation of women deeply connected to their culture’s history.  Saenz first started Chulita Vinyl Club, or CVC, in Austin, TX in December 2014 and now has seven chapters. Although recently new to the Bay Area, Saenz now works frequently with the chulita chapter there.

She recalls certain DJs and music she loves, and realizes there were not many DJs that played the combination of sounds she loved - especially women DJs, for that matter.  So in her later twenties, she went for it as a hobby, and created a supportive following.  

During her speech at Women In Music, Saenz emphasized the fact that talent buyers need to start booking more women to headline shows.


Why she loves what she does and why her mentality matters: “If you don’t see yourself up there it doesn’t mean you don’t belong there.”

To learn more about Saenz and Chulita Vinyl Club, check out their freshly launched website: https://www.chulitavinylclub.com/

Member of the Month: Abrina

Photo via Abrina's Instagram

Honoring women and recognizing their dopeness is what The Wimpact does year round. With March being Women’s History Month, though, this time is a special reminder to honor and empower women in music for deliberately creating their stamp in the music industry.  25-year-old R&B and pop feminist recording artist, Abrina, is one of the amazing women in the industry who leads by example.  

Our Wimpact’s March member of the month is highly respected for proudly walking in downtown Los Angeles’ Women’s March and for never giving up when the odds were against her.  Abrina is an independent Los Angeles based singer, songwriter who was born and raised in sunny San Diego.  This California girl made her dreams come true and she is looking forward to more opportunities to fulfill her desire to uplift and strengthen the next generation of young women.  

Through her tumultuous experience in the industry, she has had the privilege of working with other strong women that have helped her along the way, while also having to prove herself to male counterparts. She was candid about the reality she has faced in the music industry and why she stands as a feminist:

Photo via Abrina's Instagram

“I identify as a feminist because I have been around men who thought a woman shouldn’t be in a higher position than them when it comes to work and business.  I have had experiences in my life where I felt ruled out or subjected as easier to take advantage of or weaker because I was a woman.  I have seen men be lenient on other men and hard on women and, most importantly, I hate double standards.  I hate when men can get away with everything, but a woman gets called out for everything.  So as you can see I have a pretty long list.  I learned I have so much strength as a woman and have been lucky enough to be around very strong women who have inspired me, so I just want to do the same for other young women around me.”

With a little amount of sleep due to a late night studio session, nothing stopped Abrina from waking up with purpose to march for women.

“There’s real issues we’re fighting for and I knew that me being an artist, and me being all about female empowerment, who was I to not go out there and march. Of course, I just needed to. It’s all about what I am and what I’m trying to be.”

Through her unfortunate encounters and tough lessons with industry drama and politics, she has gotten inspiration for her unflinchingly fierce music. Her girl boss anthem “It Ain’t Nothin’” speaks volumes and showcases how she refuses to back down.  It became a radio hit in her hometown.

“My most powerful tool is my music, so definitely I want to continue through the music - putting out little messages here and there about achieving your dreams and pushing and staying positive and never letting anything stop you and all about getting it and making it happen for yourself,” Abrina emphasized.   

Creating top music and utilizing her platform redefined her goals. She wants to become more active in helping others because she is made of empathy and compassion. Abrina said, “It’s hard being a young female… We really need to raise strong, intelligent women who are really going to make changes in the future, so I just want to do more. “

Photo via Abrina's Instagram

Before her patience and determination began to pay off (leading to collaborations with top producers and creators), music had already been a huge part of her life. It runs deep in her Mexican-American bloodline.  In her tender years, she took over the stage in dance and junior theatre and performed at family gatherings thanks to her grandfather’s push.

“For Christmas we had a little band play, so he got up and was on the congas,” Abrina said with pure joy in her voice.  “You can just see it in his face. He was like the happiest person ever.”

Safe to say, Abrina followed in her abuelo’s footsteps, and naturally her passion for the arts developed and built her career. Her Latin culture is something she learned to incorporate in the beginning of her career.  

“From being in the industry and having the opportunity to go to different countries like the Philippines or Latin America and I see that as something that I could add to the world,” Abrina explained.  “I want to share part of my culture.  People always ask me, ‘Oh, what are you?’ And when they find out that I’m Mexican, they’re taken back ‘like, what.. really?’ I feel like there’s parts of the world where they could really learn and know more about my culture, so I want to share it more with the world.  That’s one thing that’s really important to me way more now than it was before.”

At 21-years-old, she left her hometown and moved to Los Angeles. Since then she has accomplished a lot, even with her humble beginnings working in retail.  What set off her tour in the Philippines was when her hit song with Baby Bash, “FallBack”, went Top 10.  

Photo via Abrina's Instagram

Her advice to women and those starting out in the industry:

“Make a plan. Have a clear vision. Understand there’s going to be haters. There’s going to be people that have bad intentions. Build thick skin. Stay true to yourself.  It’s not necessarily the most talented that make it; it’s the most driven, and that’s in any industry.  Just know it’s not easy. Not everybody just hits it big overnight and just gets picked up by a big label like Usher.  It’s an organic hustle.  It’s literally everyday, just staying on top of it.  Never stop. Never let anybody tell you you can’t do something.  Always believe in yourself and continue always believing in yourself. Learn from your mistakes. Stay persistent.”  

She is gracious, talented and a joy to be around.  Her music will bring out the girl boss in you. Some of the girl bosses that inspired her are Selena, Beyonce, TLC and definitely Shakira.  Even though she has been compared to “the baddest” JLo, she wants to be in her own lane.  The Wimpact applauds her positive influence.

 

How do you feel about being member of the month for Women’s History Month?

“I feel very honored.  Thank you.  I am just glad that I someway, some how inspire other women and empower other women.  And it’s hard - it’s not easy doing what I do, and just being an artist, and just being out there and having the odds against you and just pursuing what makes me the most happy and what makes me, me.  So I’m just glad that through my music and through my hustle, I can at the same time empower other women, so it’s great.  It’s amazing.”


Her music is available on iTunes and Spotify.  Stay tuned for her second EP and a pre-summer mixtape, in addition to a single with Jonn Hart.  

Member of the Month: Silvana Imam

The Wimpact’s powerfully tenacious member of the month uses fear as motivation to fight the consequences of the patriarchy and needs no validation to continue doing so.  Stockholm, Sweden-based feminist rapper, Silvana Imam, utilizes her platform to be the voice for many.  In all her musical accomplishments and societal trailblazing, she remains humble, grounded and authentic.  At a time where some political leaders try to divide us through jargon, Silvana keeps it real. We commend and appreciate her fearless, unapologetic stance on social justice issues.  

Photo by Pierre Bjork

She captures everything the music industry needs more of:  An immigrant fighting for immigrants, a queer fighting for queers, a woman fighting for women, a freedom fighter, who is fighting for everyone’s equal rights.  She is humble, outspoken and raw.  Her music is nothing different than the Silvana Imam you meet in person, none of it is for the fame and glory, her purpose is to serve the people.  Silvana unquestionably and instinctively turned fear from violent threats as a constant source of motivation.

 

“That is my inspiration,” Silvana further emphasizes how she utilizes her own privilege.  “If I have to go hiding, and I have a house, I have food on the table, I have money in the bank, then I’m good. But imagine all these people who don’t have a voice, imagine all these people that don’t have a home, those who have to flee their country because of war, that’s what I do it for, it’s about life.  It’s not a gimmick.”

 

The recent headlines on immigration hit home for the “Imam Cobain” rapper.  Her relatives in Syria are affected by border regulations.  Her cousin traveled from Syria to Denmark on a boat with her two children, five days without food or water.  “There are really no words to describe how I feel about it,” Silvana says with heart aching sadness in her voice. “It’s just the right wing parties are really feeding off of the clickbait news, September 11 terrorists… That’s how it started, especially since we have a right wing racist apartheid in our government called the Swedish Democrats, they are definitely doing that.”

 

Silvana’s fierce drive to be a voice for the voiceless has stem from a place of empathy.  Her childhood and upbringing shaped her in every way when she admitted to always feeling like an outsider.  After being born in Lithuania to a Lithuanian mother and Syrian father, her family soon moved to Prague and eventually immigrated to Sweden when Silvana was four-years-old.

 

As a child, Silvana recalls both her parents speaking about politics and the importance of standing in solidarity.  Both her parents were keen on making sure Silvana and her sister knew their Syrian and Lithuanian culture. Being multicultural worked for and against her as she was growing up traveling to her family’s homeland during the summer and holidays.  “Now I feel like the whole world is my platform, so before when I was younger in Syria, I felt like an immigrant, when I was in Sweden, I felt like an immigrant, when I was in Lithuania I felt like an immigrant,” She says.  “I felt like there was something wrong not being from that country because I just didn’t fit in, but then that’s how the world is; they make you believe that there’s something wrong with being different.” 

 

Over the years she eventually met people who were able to connect with her struggles, and together they built a movement.  The beauty of this artist, she does not care about norms. “I don’t care about fitting in or not fitting in,” Silvana highlights.  “That’s not what matters, what matters is who you are as a person and your values and stuff like that… I’m more open to other people than a lot of Swedes are because I am a lot of things, because of the way I am.”  

 

Her personal feminist journey has developed through core values instilled at a young age.  She says, “I’ve had the same values since I was like five-years-old… When I first heard the word ‘feminist,’ ok, so, ‘What is this?’ I think I’ve been identifying with it, I was a feminist before I knew the word.”

 

Silvana does not believe the divide of borders or nationalities, but because of her basic beliefs she feels it is important to identify with labels to speak on issues and to stand up for oppressed groups.  

 

“I don’t care that I’m Syrian, I don’t care that I’m a lesbian, it’s just who you are it doesn’t define who you are.  But just because it’s important, and gay people are discriminated, it’s important to me to really make myself, make my voice heard because you know we’re getting killed out there, so I need to be heard.  People come up to me and say ‘you saved my life, you made me believe in myself, you made me want to come out.  It’s important now that I have that platform to do that.”

 

When it comes to music, rap was the genre she identified with the most, but because there was no particular rapper she could identify with, she turned to poetry and creating music on her own, which perfectly exemplifies the quote, “She need a hero, so she became one.”

 

She connected with the political messages and influences she would hear from artists such as The Fugees.  “My parents always talked about this stuff, as a kid you’re seven-years-old you don’t listen to your parents, but when I heard my parents messages through rap and through Fugees it made me realize, ‘whoa that was more interesting for me.’” Silvana explains.  “I could actually relate when it comes from cool rap stars, of course as a kid you, it’s cool when you can identify with rap stars more than your parents.  

 

She was inspired by The Fugess, and it was the first CD she purchased at seven-years-old. With her love for classical music and a mixture of beats, Silvana began to create “her own space and her own world.”   

 

Her relentless spirit eventually led her to her dream team consisting of genuine people that not only align with Silvana’s vision, but also her values.  She got in contact with her manager Babak Azarmi of Respect My Hustle Management (RMH) through a mutual friend that knew they would hit it off as business partners.  Babak was eager to learn more about her vision and why she wanted to do music.

 

“We talked about life and what’s important and music and why do you love to create,” Silvana explains.  “All these questions that other managers and people within the music business didn’t ask me.  They didn’t care; it was all about selling CDs, or selling this or selling that.  So that made me really want to work with him because there was something more powerful.” She stresses how it is important that the people who work with and for her are aware of the patriarchal consequences, and that they are open-minded and enlightened.  

 

Silvana is the first rapper to sign with Swedish House Mafia’s DJ Ingrosso.  With all the record labels reaching out to her, she knew Refune Records was the right fit because of the “clash” of genres.  She loved the idea of bringing hip-hop and house techno together.  Most importantly, she knew she would remain the boss of her own music.  

 

What can more people in the music industry do to overthrow the patriarchy and destroy sexism?

“If I had the answer to that, all these questions, you should actually just ask a man because male rappers or male artists because they’re the ones who should think about this.  They’re the ones who should step back and they’re the ones who should be enlightened like you and I, we’re already enlightened, know about this.  There’s so much I can do, I’m already doing it, but the ones who really have to do something and step back are men.” She’s right - we need allies, those who hold themselves accountable.

 

Why we love her: “That’s why I speak up because if I’m silent, they won, and we’re all silent.  And I have a voice.  I would die if I didn’t have an outlet and I didn’t use that platform.  This is what saved my life.”

 

More fun facts about this dope rapper: she a holds a degree in Psychology from the University of Stockholm, she wants to get involved in basketball and she is dating one of the hottest pop stars in Sweden, Beatrice Eli.


Silvana’s music and her most recent album “Naturkraft” is available on iTunes and Spotify. This year, you can also find her on the big screen. Documentarians and filmmakers have been filming her for two years and this September 2017 she will be heading to multiple film festivals such as Cannes Film Festival to showcase her life.  We are so proud of our member!

 

 

 Below is a collection of her insights from when she talked to The Wimpact earlier this week:


Immigration has been taking over headlines recently, as an immigrant from Lithuania at 4-years-old to eventually Sweden, how has that shaped you as an artist and as a person?

“It shaped me in every way because, you know, when I was a kid I felt like I didn’t belong anywhere.  I felt like an outsider.  I kinda still do but you know.  But now I feel like the whole world is my platform, so before when I was younger in Syria, I felt like an immigrant. When I was in Sweden, I felt like an immigrant. When I was in Lithuania, I felt like an immigrant.  I felt like there was something wrong not being from that country with me because I just didn’t fit in, but then because that’s how the world is, they make you believe that there’s something wrong with being different.  But over the years I met a lot people who felt like me and we built a movement and I don’t care about norms and I don’t care about fitting in or not fitting in.  That’s not what matters. What matters is who you are as a person and your values and stuff like that so…”
 

When did you start to identify as a feminist?

“I’ve had a the same values since I was like 5-years-old. I’ve always thought ‘Well my values are the same.’ But then when the whole discussion, when I first heard the word feminist, ok so ‘What is this? Oh, ok. This is exactly what I’ve been talking about - nice. There’s a name for it.’  I think I’ve been identifying with it, I was a feminist before I knew the word.”

 

Having family in Syria, what’s your perspective on the overall immigration and refugee situation both in the U.S., Sweden and worldwide?

“They closed the border in April of last year.  It’s devastating, of course.  They make it look like the world has never been worst than it is now, but that’s not true. People have been migrating for decades… Social media and people are not researching the information. Click bait-information is suppose to come very fast and then disappears, like Twitter. Everything is quick information. You don’t see the sources.  I think that’s a very big problem today.  I have relatives and family in Syria - it affects them. It’s just horrible because my cousin, she came to Denmark on a boat, five days without water, without food, there are really no words to describe how I feel about it. It’s just the right wing parties are really feeding off of the clickbait news - September 11 terrorists, let’s fight terrorism.  That’s how it started, especially since we have a right wing racist apartheid in our government called the Swedish Democrats. They are definitely doing that.”

 

At what age did you start being interested in music?

“I always listened to rap and I always identified with rap, but I never identified with a rapper because there was no one I could identify with, so I just started.  Rap is really discusses all sorts of political issues and that’s why I identified with rap.  So basically after that, I was like 7-years-old when I got my first CD...”  

Photo by Fredrik Nystedt

How did your relationship with Respect My Hustle Management (RMH) develop and grow over time?

“Basically me and Babak, my manager, came in contact and we started talking and he was like, ‘So why do you want to do music?’ We talked about life and what’s important and music and why do you love to create - all these questions that other managers and people within the music business didn’t ask me.  They didn’t care.  It was all about selling CDs, or selling this or selling that.  We didn’t talk about that at all.  So that made me really want to work with him because there was something more powerful.  Through a friend of mine, she knew I had all these ideas because I talked to her about what I wanted to do and she was like, ‘You have to speak to Babak. I think you two would get along really well.’  So I contacted him and we met.”

 

What was it like becoming the first rapper to work with Swedish House Mafia’s Ingrosso and Refune Records?

“We were looking for someone who could distribute my music.  A lot of record labels, they reached out to us.  We found Refune -  the most interesting one because it’s a clash…”

 

Is there one culture you identify with more than the other (Syria, Lithuania, Sweden)?

“I made a mix of them all: Sweden, Lithuania and Syria.  It’s like a mixture of them all.  I don’t identify with one more than the other.  I don’t believe in borders.  I don’t believe in nationalities. Not my strongest belief, but my basic belief because of how the world looks like today. I have to identify with these labels.  I don’t care that I’m Syrian. I don’t care that I’m a lesbian. It’s just who you are. It doesn’t define who you are.  But just because it’s important, and gay people are discriminated, it’s important to me to really make myself, make my voice heard because you know we’re getting killed out there, so I need to be heard.  People come up to me and say, ‘You saved my life. You made me believe in myself. You made me want to come out.’  It’s important now that I have that platform to do that.”

 

Do you get support from the hip-hop community in Sweden?

“The thing is I never cared about it.  I never cared about the support from other artists, or the music industry, and I still don’t care because it’s still a corporation. And so when I look at where I’m at it’s because I’m the voice of the people, so I get support from the people, and that’s all I need.  I really don’t care about this or that person because that person is ‘important’ or whatever.  These critics or journalists, I don’t care because I let my music speak for itself and if my listeners identify with that, then I’ve done my job.”

 

How have you experienced injustices in life and in the music industry?

“The first thing is people labeled me as a ‘female rapper’, but you know that was in the beginning and then as time went by and I released more songs and I released my EPs and my album, I made them see that I’m undeniably the greatest rapper in Sweden. So I kind of shut them down through my music. So now you can’t say ‘Oh she’s a female rapper.’  You can say I’m a female rapper, but I’m better than you. I’m selling out fucking shows.  There were over 10,000 people there.  You could say whatever you want.  You can call me a female rapper, whatever, but look who’s selling out shows.  That’s the biggest thing - people, well, men, always men who are like, ‘Yeah, it’s because you’re a female rapper.’ But I think that’s every female that does music, or almost every.  I feel like almost every female experiences this.  It’s different in rap because it’s such a male-dominated genre.”

Photo via Silvana's Instagram

 

What can more people in the music industry do to overthrow the patriarchy and destroy sexism?

“…You should actually just ask a man because male rappers or male artists, they’re the ones who should think about this.  They’re the ones who should step back and they’re the ones who should be enlightened - like you and I, we’re already enlightened, know about this.  There’s so much I can do. I’m already doing it, but the ones who really have to do something and step back are men.”

 

You told Sway in the Morning you had to hide in the woods due to threats. How do you maintain inspiration after something scary?

“That is my inspiration.  If I have to go hiding, and I have a house, I have food on the table, I have money in the bank, I’m good. But imagine all these people who don’t have a voice. Imagine all these people that don’t have a home, those who have to flee their country because of war. That’s what I do it for. It’s about life.  It’s not a gimmick.  It’s not for the fun of it. For me, of course I’m having fun, but it’s also super important for me to express myself because of what I’ve been through, because what my relatives go through today and what my parents went through coming to Sweden.  And what they go through as second-class citizens.  That’s why I speak up because if I’m silent, they won, and we’re all silent.  And I have a voice.  I would die if I didn’t have an outlet and I didn’t use that platform.  This is what saved my life.”

 

Define yourself as a “conscious rapper”.

“Through my music, through what I’m saying, there’s nothing more. If you listen to my music, you understand who I am, my beliefs, You agree with me and like my songs or you like my songs but you don’t agree with me. But the thing is, I don’t think the people who don’t agree with me, listen to my songs.  I’m very outspoken like that.  I’m just a creator.”

 

Photo via Silvana's Instagram